Sunday, July 29, 2007

HTML beginners - copying source code.

HTML
Although blog software does makes it possible to produce your pages without knowing any web coding, there are times when you do need to enter html. If nothing else you are likely to need to enter web links in your posts or sidebar from time to time. If you don't know any html do not despair! There are ways round it.

Any browser will allow you to view the page source,, but finding the particular code may not be easy but, as I like 'easy', here are better options if you want to just find out code for part of a web page.

If you just want to create a link or clickable image you can use an online tool such as Quick Link Maker.

Firefox offers an inbuilt solution, which will show you the source code for any text you wish to know the html code for; including links:

Highlight any text on a page, right click and choose 'View Selection Source' from the drop down menu. A window will appear showing a snippet of html code, with the the area you selected highlighted.

It is usually just a matter of copying the highlighted area.

I say "usually" as there are times when you need to make sure that you have all the correct tags. For example, in case you have not highlighted all the text in a link or are copying part of a list or multiple paragraphs. This is what you need to make sure of:

  • The html for a link to another web page always starts with <a and ends with </a>

  • An image starts with < img and ends with > (if the link is clickable then it will be surrounded with the link tags of the first example.

  • Paragraphs start with <p> and end with </p>

    Your blog software will add paragraph breaks for you but if you are copying multiple paragraphs make sure you take out any end tags that don't have their opening ones and vice versa.
    e.g. if the code you copy is

    "...this is the end of one paragraph.</p><p>This is the end of another .."

    either take out the </p><p> and enter line breaks as you normally do in your blog post compose window, or add the necessary beginning and end tags:

    <p>...this is the end of one paragraph</p><p>This is the beginning of the next...</p>
  • A list usually takes the form of:

    <ul>
    <li>the text you see</li>
    <li>the text you see in line 2</li>
    </ul>

    This is called an unordered list (hence the ul shortform) There may be classes or ids added to the <ul> tag but as long as you have the <ul bit as the start that is all you need to worry about.

    A numbered list is similar and is called an ordered list:

    <ol>
    <li>the text you see</li>
    <li>the text you see in line 2</li>
    </ol>

I will be talking more about using online tools to make your blogging life easier in the near future.

tag , alexablogging to fame

No comments:

Sunday, July 29, 2007

HTML beginners - copying source code.

HTML
Although blog software does makes it possible to produce your pages without knowing any web coding, there are times when you do need to enter html. If nothing else you are likely to need to enter web links in your posts or sidebar from time to time. If you don't know any html do not despair! There are ways round it.

Any browser will allow you to view the page source,, but finding the particular code may not be easy but, as I like 'easy', here are better options if you want to just find out code for part of a web page.

If you just want to create a link or clickable image you can use an online tool such as Quick Link Maker.

Firefox offers an inbuilt solution, which will show you the source code for any text you wish to know the html code for; including links:

Highlight any text on a page, right click and choose 'View Selection Source' from the drop down menu. A window will appear showing a snippet of html code, with the the area you selected highlighted.

It is usually just a matter of copying the highlighted area.

I say "usually" as there are times when you need to make sure that you have all the correct tags. For example, in case you have not highlighted all the text in a link or are copying part of a list or multiple paragraphs. This is what you need to make sure of:

  • The html for a link to another web page always starts with <a and ends with </a>

  • An image starts with < img and ends with > (if the link is clickable then it will be surrounded with the link tags of the first example.

  • Paragraphs start with <p> and end with </p>

    Your blog software will add paragraph breaks for you but if you are copying multiple paragraphs make sure you take out any end tags that don't have their opening ones and vice versa.
    e.g. if the code you copy is

    "...this is the end of one paragraph.</p><p>This is the end of another .."

    either take out the </p><p> and enter line breaks as you normally do in your blog post compose window, or add the necessary beginning and end tags:

    <p>...this is the end of one paragraph</p><p>This is the beginning of the next...</p>
  • A list usually takes the form of:

    <ul>
    <li>the text you see</li>
    <li>the text you see in line 2</li>
    </ul>

    This is called an unordered list (hence the ul shortform) There may be classes or ids added to the <ul> tag but as long as you have the <ul bit as the start that is all you need to worry about.

    A numbered list is similar and is called an ordered list:

    <ol>
    <li>the text you see</li>
    <li>the text you see in line 2</li>
    </ol>

I will be talking more about using online tools to make your blogging life easier in the near future.

tag , alexablogging to fame

No comments: